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Five Questions – Greg Rinckey

July 7, 2007

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Greg T. Rinckey, 33, is a lawyer from Delmar who works with the firm Tully, Rinckey & Associates. He served with the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General Corps until 2004. He is speaking out against the possibility he may be recalled to duty before the end of this year as part of changes to the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) program. It is a test case that Rinckey believes may lead to even more soldiers being involuntarily recalled.

Q: Why did you leave military service?

A: I had just gotten married, my obligation (to the military) was up, and my partner called me. He was interested in bringing a partner in his law firm. I made the decision with my wife it was time to leave the Army.

Q: What are the good and bad points of being involuntarily recalled under IRR?

A: The good point is serving with some of the finest people in the country. That’s one of the things I miss – the quality of the people. One of the down sides, of course, would be leaving my family, leaving my business. My wife would be left with little support.

Q: Why is this expanded involuntary recall under way?

A: That’s actually a policy change they’re going to be implementing this month. You’re supposed to report for one day, but everybody knows what that’s leading to. The Army realizes they’ve lost control of the IRR. The next step is going to be orders to active duty.

Q: Your partner, Mathew Tully, was involuntarily recalled two years ago. How did that affect his life? A: He had to deal with a lot of issues in his personal life. It was rough on his wife, having to deal with everything, with the house. When you get back, there’s that period of time when you have to get to know each other again. Q: What would you leave behind if called to serve under IRR?

A: I would leave my business behind, my family, all of my commitments and part of my pay.

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